A career as a certified pharmacy technician can be very rewarding. The demand for techs is strong and you have the option to continue your education and pursue becoming a pharmacist. You can also apply your knowledge in other medical field. Today, you have to be certified to work as a pharmacy technician in most US states; this requirement is bond by law.
The most popular certification is offer by Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB). Passing the PTCB exam will qualify to register and become a licensed pharmacy technician in most states. Certification and license will increase your opportunities and competitive edge in a very challenging market.
The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board administers the certification test and offers a guidebook. You may register for the exam as well as access the guidebook and other resources at their website. There are also many information sources that can be accessed online. You should also visit your neighboring library to check books.
The PTCB exam covers three main focus of knowledge required of pharmacy technician including: Assisting the Pharmacist in Serving Patients, Maintaining Medication and Inventory Control Systems, and Participating in the Administration and Management of Pharmacy Practice.
Assisting the Pharmacist in Serving Patients was 66% of the exam in 2007 and includes knowledge of anatomy and physiology, knowledge of pharmaceutical and medical abbreviations and terminology, and knowledge of effects of patient’s age (for example, neonates, geriatrics) on drug and non-drug therapy.
Maintaining Medication and Inventory Control Systems was 22% of the exam in 2007 and includes knowledge of regulatory requirements regarding record-keeping for repackaged products, recalled products, and refunded products, knowledge of policies, procedures, and practices regarding storage and handling of hazardous materials and wastes (for example, Materials Safety Data Sheet [MSDS]), and knowledge of inventory receiving process.
Participating in the Administration and Management of Pharmacy Practice was 12% of the exam in 2007 and includes knowledge of sanitation requirements (for example, hand washing, cleaning counting trays, countertop, and equipment), knowledge of procedures to document occurrences such as medication errors, adverse effects, and product integrity (for example, FDA Med Watch Program), and knowledge of lines of communication throughout the organization.
The guidebook to the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board exam is a comprehensive 41 page document which covers these topics as well as many others and prepares you for taking the exam.

For more information about Pharmacy technician training and certification, visit Pharmacy technician training JB

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